January 31, 2014

Focusing on the process

Much of life's agonies and anxieties arise from our constant attention to the personal gains we anticipate at the end of our actions rather than on the process of our actions. Spiritual thinking says that where our attention goes is what is energized in us. So it is logical that with that huge investment of our mental energy on the prize at the end of the line we have little energy left to invest in the process. Thus it can only be mediocre efforts we put to the process. The result is that the quality of our work suffers and the outputs too inherit that poor quality determined by what we had put in.

If we can look at our present state of affairs in our Maldives - and without doubt so informed and energized by the influences of the get-rich-quick materialistic world -- we can fathom the depths of social lethargy we are sinking into.

In this present time, the dignity of labour is shunted out of sight as a vestige of the past and everyone seems ready for the clamour to the top whether deserved or not. The focus is only on the prize at the end and HOW we get it is no more the question than THAT we get it.

Unless we can revert to a focus on mindfully performing our work as each person's social responsibility, a time is soon to come when regretful cries will fill our days ahead. To wake up then or watch in lament from another dimension many of us will have by then transited into will not help our children or grandchildren. Let not selfishness, avarice and surely pain as a consequence, be the hallmark of our life in this world!  

3 comments:

Ashfaq Abdulla said...

Dear Editor
Very inspiring piece of article. How to make an impact to the general public, with your significant thoughts and messages? I strongly suggest you to find a reasonable column in the local news papers, where this message could be reached the decision making personalities in our community. This is the most important moment the public awareness is required.
Thank you.

Abdul Sattar Yoosuf said...

Very valid and encouraging suggestion. This is the missing part of our national dialogue;the economic and the political is in full hype; the social is indeed way behind. I am working with the Panel for National Harmony in Maldives to get this kind of information out to the youth and public.

ahmed razee said...

And consider the damaging fall out of frustrated ambitions too